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call for papers - Hypatia

Click Hypatia for link to the journal’s web site

Call For Papers: Feminist Theory and Democratic Thought
Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy is seeking papers for a special issue on Feminist Theory and Democratic Thought, guest edited by Noëlle McAfee and R. Claire Snyder. In the past twenty years there has been a resurgence of thinking about democratic theory and civil society, with an increasing number of political theorists (such as Jürgen Habermas, Michael Sandel, and Robert Putnam, to name a few) engaged in spirited debates about the role of citizens and noncitizens in the "public sphere," about nongovernmental spaces of common problem solving ("civil society"), and about the ways that diverse individuals could develop a public will that might provide the normative direction for public policy and hold government more accountable to the people. During this resurgence, several prominent feminist theorists have weighed in on these questions, writing groundbreaking texts on the ways in which politics and democracy have been constituted by excluding women or "the feminine." Also during this time, feminist work in other areas has proliferated, from feminist epistemology to transnational feminist theory, from feminist uses of psychoanalysis to those thinking about race, gender, identity, and sexual orientation. Whether directly or indirectly, all this feminist scholarship addresses political issues of justice, knowledge, identity, community, and ethics. Yet these feminist engagements in politics rarely intersect with the mainstream conversations regarding democracy and civil society. Nationally and internationally, the field of democratic theory is still dominated by scholars who largely ignore feminist issues, even those raised by the most prominent feminist political theorists. This special issue of Hypatia seeks to bring these conversations into dialogue. How might democratic theory evolve if it were more feminist? What might an explicitly democratic, feminist account of politics look like? How might collaborations in these areas produce richer visions of a more democratic politics for the twenty-first century?
Possible topics include, but are by no means restricted to:
• political lessons to be learned from developments in feminist theory and practice
• transnational feminist challenges to traditional ways of thinking about the nation-state, civic subjectivity, globalization,inside/outside dichotomies, identity politics, and participation
• feminist interventions in theories of civil society
• feminist reworkings of deliberative democratic theory
• race, class, and gender in democratic politics
• new approaches to radical democracy and agonal politics
• psychoanalysis and politics
• reconstructions of subjectivity and the public sphere
• care ethics and democratic theory
• using feminist epistemology to understand public will formation
• feminist theory, civil society, and citizenship
• implications of feminist theory for democratic politics
• implications of democratic theory for feminist politics
• the wisdom of trying to develop a positive democratic feminist vision of politics
• the perils of moving from feminist critique to feminist construction of political theory
• other meta-analyses of feminist political theorizing

Papers should be no more than 8,000 words long, prepared for anonymous review, accompanied by an abstract of no more than 100 words, and identified as a submission for the special issue on Feminist Theory and Democratic Thought. The paper submission deadline is 1 December 2005. Contributors are to follow the Hypatia style guidelines as found at the Hypatia website: http://www.msu.edu/~hypatia. Please e-mail all correspondence and manuscripts, saved as attachments in Word or WordPerfect, to hypatia@msu.edu.

Call For Papers: Against Heterosexualism
Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy is seeking papers for a special issue to be guest edited by Joan Callahan and Sara Ruddick under the working title "Against Heterosexualism: Overcoming Heterosexual Normativity and Defeating Heterosexist Bigotry." The working title of this issue is meant to indicate that papers should address the normativity of heterosexuality and heterosexist bigotry as two prongs of what we call heterosexualism: a cultural norm that needs to be well understood and decisively rejected. Thus, we seek papers that not only illuminate these concepts and their realities, but that in some way also address how these realities can be changed.
Possible topics include, but are by no means restricted to:

• the moral, psychological, and social harms of heterosexual normativity;
• heterosexist bigotry as atrocity;
• the pervasive presence of heterosexual normativity throughout culture(s);
• revelation and analysis of the kinds of bigotry, discrimination, and violence perpetrated against sexual and
gender minorities;
• heterosexualism and ignorance (e.g., why do so many good heterosexual people seem not tocomprehend the gravity of the social exclusion of sexual and gender minorities?);
• motives, character, and social situations of the perpetrators of heterosexist discrimination and violence (e.g., so-called homophobia, the assertion of privilege and exercise of power, the will of [some] god);
• motives and reasons for the indifference of bystanders;
• critiques of legal, psychological, and other institutional defenses of heterosexualism;
• heterosexualism and race/ethnicity;
• heterosexualism and class;
• heterosexualism and aging;
• heterosexualism and disability;
• heterosexualism and health care;
• relations between heterosexualism and communities of faith (including why so many persons of faith who really do not support heterosexist discrimination nonetheless continue to permit such discrimination in their communities of faith and allow heterosexist bigotry to be enacted in the name of people of faith);
• relations between heterosexualism and religious fundamentalism locally and globally;
• the special effects of heterosexual normativity on transpersons (who, for example, are virtually invisible in the current debates around same-sex marriage);
• same-sex marriage and its importance to overcoming heterosexualism;
• heterosexist hate speech, its contributions to bigotry, its harms;
• various resistances by those outside the heterosexual norm and their effects;
and VERY importantly,
• strategies for overcoming heterosexual normativity and for defeating heterosexual bigotry.
Papers should be less than 10,000 words long, prepared for anonymous review, and accompanied by an abstract of no more than 75 words. Please provide a cover letter identifying your paper as a submission for the special issue "Against Heterosexualism." The deadline for submissions is 1 December 2004. Papers should be submitted by electronic attachment in Word or WordPerfect to Joan Callahan at buddy@pop.uky.edu. Authors should follow the Hypatia style guidelines, which can be found at http://www.msu.edu/~hypatia/. Please address all correspondence, questions and suggestions to Joan Callahan at buddy@pop.uky.edu. We look forward to hearing from you.

________________________________________
Call for Papers:
The Reproduction of Whiteness: Race and the Regulation of the Gendered Body
Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy is seeking papers for a special issue addressing the ways in which race and racism have been present in the disciplining and regulation of reproduction. The issue will be guest edited by Alison Bailey and Jacquelyn N. Zita.
Over the last two decades feminist philosophers, critical race theorists, postcolonial theorists, progressive historians, and political activists revisited and reexamined questions of race and identity. Collectively these scholars and activists have made visible the ways in which the social construction of race informs scholarly inquiry and public policy. Most of these writings identify "whiteness" as a cultural disposition and ideology held in place by specific political, social, aesthetic, epistemic, metaphysical, economic, legal, and historical conditions crafted to preserve white identity and supremacy. Yet outside of Dorothy Roberts's landmark Killing the Black Body: Race, Reproduction and the Meaning of Liberty (1997) very little attention has been paid to the ways women's bodies have been, and continue to be, disciplined and regulated to reinforce the dominant (white) racial order.
The relative silence around the connections between race and reproduction is striking, given the strong historical connections. The regulation of racial, ethnic, and national boundaries has been tied closely to the regulation of women's--and to a lesser extent men's--bodies. Recall that white anxiety about immigration pushed the criminalization of abortion in the U.S. forward. Or how forced sterilization of women of color has been used to regulate/exterminate communities of color. If racial identity is also preserved through reproductive policy and sexual standards, why haven't these topics been engaged more frequently? If reproduction is disciplined along racial lines, then why hasn't it been central to discussions of resistance to racism? The purpose of this special issue is to bring discussions of reproduction, sexuality, and race together in ways that make these connections visible, so that resistance to the reproductive racial order can also be addressed.
Possible topics include, but are by no means restricted to:
• Somatophobia (fear of the bodily) in whiteness studies
• Reproduction and critical race theory
• The racialized management of adoption, abortion, artificial insemination, egg and sperm donation, and surrogacy
• The historic and contemporary role of eugenics in maintaining racial categories
• Reproductive resistance
• The racialization of pregnant bodies
• The relationship between reproductive policies and nation building
• The distortion, invisibility, and cooptation of women of color's reproductive labor
• Links between women's status and their reproductive and sexual choices
• Race and GLBT parenting
• Incarnating matrimonial whiteness
• White sex and race formation
• Engendering whiteness studies
• Globalizing whiteness in women's bodies
Papers should be less than 10,000 words long, prepared for anonymous review, and accompanied by an abstract of no more than 75 words. Please provide a cover letter identifying your paper as a submission for the special issue "Reproduction of Whiteness." The deadline for submissions is 1 May 2005. Papers should be submitted by electronic attachment in Word or WordPerfect to both Alison Bailey at baileya@ilstu.edu and Jacquelyn N. Zita at zitax001@umn.edu. Authors should follow the Hypatia style guidelines, which can be found at http://www.msu.edu/~hypatia/. Please address all correspondence, manuscripts, questions and suggestions to either Alison Bailey or Jackie Zita. We look forward to hearing from you.
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